The Impact

Be a part of the impact

 By, LANE SCHWEITZER

SAN MARCOS – The McCoy College of Business Net Impact Chapter at Texas State University has influenced change throughout San Marcos and neighboring cities by creating business projects that focus on social and environmental sustainability.

Net Impact is a student-lead, project-based organization that has already launched multiple successful campaigns. The organization has worked with a diverse mix of social and environmental issues that have pushed students to create solutions that affect real world change.

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Net Impact at Texas State adopts a spot to keep clean along San Marcos highway. Photo Credit: Net Impact – Texas State Facebook

“My job is to take ideas and help magnify them,” said Janet Hale, Business Lawyer and sponsor for the McCoy College of Business Net Impact Chapter. “I keep my ear to the ground in order to find projects that are new and happening for the students.”

Only four months after its initiation, Net Impact at Texas State embarked on a mission to reduce the amount of energy that students were using daily by educating them on the benefits of drying one’s clothes via the sun. The organization’s official video, Wear the Sun – A Look at Solar Drying, can be viewed using the following link.

In 2010, Net Impact audited 54% of the buildings on Texas State’s campus in an effort to help reduce the university’s energy consumption by 50% come the year 2020. According to Hale, after the project’s completion, Net Impact saved the university $40,000 in auditing fees and roughly $70,000 in energy use.

Net Impact has also made an effort to reach outside the confines of only Texas State, hoping to implement change on the local scale as well.

The organization received over 1500 shirts traded up from the Texas State Alumni Association and plans on donating them to Nubian Queen Lola – a Cajun restaurant in Austin, Texas, that helps feed and clothe the homeless. Net Impact also used prize money won from a Bank of America competition this year to purchase food that was donated to the Phoenix Academy of Austin, Texas.

“I know what we do is for the greater good, and for good reason,” Hale said. “We decide what we are going to do, and if we do it, we are going to do it well.”